Optimize Your PPC Campaigns With These Tips

With the right approach, pay-per-click (PPC) ad campaigns are one of the most effective channels for digital marketing. In fact, the largest PPC platform right now, Google Ads, is so popular with marketers that it rakes in more than $100 billion each year. What’s more, returns are so strong that 78% of marketers increased their Google Ads budgets in 2019.

Despite the strong returns on Google Ads, few brands take full advantage of its tools and capabilities. Rather than eye-popping ROIs, their campaigns generate middling returns. This is usually a case of poor optimization. If you skimp on important investments (like keyword research and split-testing) or skip over powerful features (like ad extensions and RLSAs), your campaigns will suffer.

But if you optimize your PPC campaigns using the 7 tips below, you’ll see much stronger returns from Google Ads.

7 Tips for Better PPC Campaigns

1. Keyword Research

Keywords are the foundation of any successful Google Ads campaign. If you target the right keywords, Google will serve your ads to the right users at the right times. That means higher click-through and conversion rates, stronger Quality Scores, and lower Costs per Click.

Unfortunately, many brands fail to invest the kind of time and effort required for effective keyword research. This typically results in a list of broad, generic keywords, which tend to be more expensive, more competitive, and less conversion-friendly.

2. Negative Keywords

One of the best ways to target a broader range of keywords is to use Google Ads’ broad match or phrase match feature. However, these features can result in mismatches. For example, if one of your keywords is “men’s jeans,” broad match could serve your ad to someone searching for “men’s khakis.” That’s not very helpful if you only sell jeans.

To avoid theses mismatches, you can use negative keywords. Google will not serve your ad to searchers whose queries contain these keywords. So if you’re only selling jeans, you can add “khakis” as a negative keyword. This way, your ad will never appear in searches for “khakis.”

3. Location Targeting

If you operate a hair salon in Pittsburgh, you don’t want to serve ads to users searching for “hair salon” from a device in Houston, Salt Lake City, or Portland. In fact, you probably don’t want to serve ads to anyone who’s more than a few miles from your business.

With location targeting, you can narrowly target searchers within a certain radius or a defined geographic area. This way, your local business can serve ads exclusively to local consumers. You can even create different campaigns for different geographic settings.

4. Remarketing Audiences

If you’re not already using remarketing lists for search ads (RLSA), you’re missing out on one of Google Ads most effective features. RLSAs allow you to target visitors who’ve previously visited your site. These users are already more likely to click on your ads and convert. Plus, you’ll be able to tailor a set of ads to this group.

Once you’ve started using RLSAs, you can also take advantage of Google Ads’ similar audiences feature. This feature automatically finds users with similar characteristics and search behaviors to the users on your RLSA lists. This gives you an entirely new group of users to target with similarly strong conversion rates.

5. Ad Extensions

Google Ads aren’t nearly as visible as other ad formats, relying largely on compelling headlines and copy. To make your ads more visible and more compelling, we recommend using ad extensions. Ad extensions allow you to include additional information, which can make your ads more compelling to users. At the same time, they increase the visibility of your ads, giving you a new way to grab users’ attention.

Some of the most popular and effective ad extensions include:

  • Call Extensions. Allow mobile users to call your business by pressing a button.
  • Callout Extensions. Add short blurbs to your ad, like “free delivery.”
  • Location Extensions. Include business information for your local business.
  • Message Extensions. Allow mobile users to send text messages to your business.
  • Sitelink Extensions. Add links to specific pages on your website.

6. Split-Testing

Split-testing has been a cornerstone of paid search campaigns from the outset. Yet many brands only perform limited A/B testing on their ads. After testing an initial set of ads at the start of a campaign, they fall into a groove. Rather than continually testing and refining ads, they allow them to stagnate.

Today, this kind of approach simply isn’t feasible. Consumer behaviors are evolving at a breakneck pace, and other advertisers are evolving just as quickly. If you’re not continually testing and refining your ads, they’ll fossilize before your eyes.

7. Conversion Tracking

Advertisers are charged for PPC ads on a click by click basis. What’s more, Google determines the cost of each click based on a Quality Score, which is determined by each ad’s click-through rate (CTR). This has made CTR the leading metric for measuring PPC ads and campaigns.

But if you’re measuring PPC campaigns by CTR alone, you’re missing the big picture. The real measure of a campaign’s success is in its conversions.

In Google Ads, you can solve this problem by adding conversion tracking to your campaigns. Conversion tracking uses HTML codes to track which users convert after clicking on PPC ads. It can be integrated with Google Analytics to track conversions through your website, and it allows you to measure important data like cost per conversion, conversion rate, and value per conversion.

Make sure you’re asking your digital marketing partner about these PPC tactics to ensure you’re getting most out of your campaigns. Contact us today to learn more about how we can help you get real results from your Pay Per Click marketing.

Getting Them To Click

Google Ads remains one of the most popular and cost-effective channels for digital marketers, boasting strong and easily measured ROI. Yet for some brands, paid search delivers middling results. Despite spending a good chunk of time and money on pay-per-click, these brands struggle to translate their investment into clicks.

A low click-through rate is the bane of any Google Ads campaign. But in many cases, it’s an easily remedied problem. With a strong understanding of why users click on paid search ads (and why they don’t), you can adjust your PPC strategy to capture clicks at a higher rate.

Why Users Click (or Don’t Click) on PPC Ads

On Google Ads, the average click-through is roughly 2%. However, this number can fluctuate in different circumstances.

For example, the average click-through rate for Google Ads on Google Search is roughly 3.15%. Yet on the Google Display Network, ads enjoy an average click-through rate of around 0.45%.

Click-through rates also vary from one sector to another. In one recent analysis, the industries with the highest click-through rates included Dating & Personals, Travel & Hospitality, and Automotive Sales. The industries with the lowest rates included Technology, B2B Vendors, and Employment Services.

But what about when you control for these factors? Why is it that some ads outperform others, even when they’re advertising the same product and targeting the same keywords?

According to a recent survey of users who clicked on paid ads, here are five of the top reasons why some ads enjoy higher click-through rates:

  1. The ad is a close or exact match for the user’s search intent.
  2. The user considers the ad the best answer to their search query.
  3. The ad is ranked above other ads and search results.
  4. The ad’s content is uniquely compelling to the user.
  5. The user recognizes and trusts the brand or product being advertised.

Based on this information, here are some quick tips and best practices to help you boost clicks on paid search ads.

How to Boost Your Click-Through Rate

Tailor Your Ads to Search Intent

The more closely your ad matches a user’s search intent, the more likely it is that the user will click on your ad. Unfortunately, many paid search ads do a poor job of answering users’ queries.

One of the best ways to get a sense of search intent for a given keyword is to look at Google’s top organic search results. These are the pages that Google believes are the best match for the users’ search query, so they’re an excellent guidepost for what kinds of ad content users will find relevant.

Effective Keyword Targeting

Low click-through rates often result from ineffective keyword targeting. Sometimes, brands over-rely on Google Ads’ “exact match” function, which can exclude valuable longtail keywords. Other times, brands use the “broad match” or “phrase match” functions, which tend to generate a mix of strong and weak keywords.

So, how can you capture longtail traffic while avoiding weak keywords? The best way to do this at the outset is to use “broad match” or “phrase match” combined with the “negative keywords” function. This will allow you to filter out keywords that contain words or phrases you don’t want to target. Over time, this will allow you to identify the keywords where you perform best.

Bid for Higher Ad Positions

If you consistently miss out on top ad positions, your click-through rate will inevitably take a hit. Ads in the #1 position on Google attract roughly six times as many clicks as ads in position #5 or lower.

So if you’re consistently ranking outside of the top two or three positions, your click-through rate will suffer. Consider experimenting with a new bid strategy to see if you can’t capture stronger ROI with larger bids.

Create Compelling Ads

Crafting compelling paid search ads is part art, part science, and well-worth the investment.

First, make sure that you’re leveraging the capabilities that Google Ads provides, like Expanded Test Ads and ad extensions. These features can increase the prominence and visibility of your ads while also adding new information to encourage clicks.

Second, take the time to craft content that resonates with users. Try to answer the user’s search query as clearly and directly as possible, use headlines to grab users’ attention, and include emotional triggers in your ad descriptions.

Target High-Value Users

Click-through rates soar when paid search ads are served to customers already familiar with a brand or product. If you’re not retargeting past visitors and existing customers, doing so could boost the performance of your paid search campaigns.

Retargeting will also give you the chance to leverage the “Similar Audience” feature on Google Ads. This feature allows you to target users with similar interests, search histories, and browsing behaviors as your retargeted audience. Similar audiences are a cost-effective way to drive clicks on paid search, since their click-through rates are comparable to the original audience.

Learn more about Qiigo’s Pay Per Click services here or speak to one of our digital experts by filling out the form.

Getting Your Paid Search Strategy Ready for 2019

It’s been more than eighteen years since the launch of Google AdWords. Nearly two decades later, AdWords remains the largest paid search platform on the internet. But a lot has changed in that time.

 

In the early years, AdWords was typically treated as an isolated platform. Marketers didn’t have the means to coordinate and measure their paid search campaigns with other channels. Now they do. As a result, paid search platforms like AdWords — which is now rivaled by Facebook Ads — have become part of a larger, multi-touchpoint sales funnel.

 

While multi-channel campaigns are far more effective than single-channel efforts, they are also much more complicated. After all, it’s easier to juggle one ball than five, ten, or fifteen at a time. Given this, it’s little surprise that many brands have failed to optimize paid search for multi-channel marketing.

 

If you’re one of these brands, it’s better late than never to implement these changes. So let’s take a look at how you can tweak your paid search campaigns for a multi-channel marketing landscape.

 

Build Multi-Channel Infrastructure

Multi-channel marketing depends on personalization. Rather than building a one-size-fits-all sales funnel, multi-channel marketers create dynamic funnels that respond to users’ behaviors. By adapting your approach to each users’ goals and preferences, you reduce friction points in the sales process, while helping users find products/services that best suit their needs.

 

To do this, you’ll need to structure paid campaigns in an easy-to-segment way. Stop relying on built-in segmentation tools found in platforms like Google AdWords and Analytics. Instead, make increased use of UTM tags to segment clicks on paid ads according to user demographics, behaviors, and preferences.

 

Segment Your Segments!

A lot of brands will segment their users at the top of the funnel and call it a day. But true segmentation involves breaking down those initial segments into smaller micro-audiences.

 

Let’s say you manage a network of auto repair centers. You run a paid search campaign targeting users searching for a local repair shop. Now you have a pool of users who you know are looking for auto maintenance or repairs. That doesn’t give you much to go on in terms of personalization.

 

But let’s say you create further micro-segments based on which service pages they look at on your website. Now you have individual buckets of users with interests like “brake repair,” “oil change,” and “transmission rebuild.” Instead of retargeting these users with generic “auto repair center” ads, you can serve them dynamic ads that are tailored to their preferences.

 

Personalize the Sales Journey

As you segment users into further micro-segments, you’ll be able to personalize the messaging and sale journey for different users and different touchpoints. Here are a few different strategies that you can employ to do so:

 

  • Tailor your CTAs according to where users are in the sales funnel. “Buy Now!” might be your most effective CTA overall, but for early-funnel users, you might have more success with something like “Learn More!” or “Browse Our Products!”
  • Target users in the right places, at the right times. It’s not enough to simply re-target users with paid search. It’s important that you target them at the right time of day, on the right devices, and in spaces where they’re open to re-connecting with your brand.
  • Take advantage of programmatic and dynamic technologies. Programmatic and dynamic ads automate a significant chunk of the personalization process. This is a much more time-effective and cost-effective way to personalize paid search and multi-channel campaigns.
  • Integrate paid search with other digital channels. Paid search is one of the most cost-effective digital marketing channels, and it can be used to hit multiple sales funnel touchpoints. But it’s only so effective on its own. Complement and enhance your paid search campaigns by hitting other touchpoints via other channels and strategies, like SEO and social media.

 

Finally, remember that paid search campaigns are a trial and error process. In many cases, initial results are underwhelming, causing brands to abandon their multi-channel efforts prematurely. You must give yourself time to test, measure, and refine these campaigns for them to be effective.

 

 

Bridging the Gap between PPC and SEO

With digital marketing playing a larger role that ever, SEO and PPC must work closer together…yes we said together. In the past, old-fashioned tactics kept many digital marketers from truly integrating these two efforts.

 

Some have viewed SEO as a threat to revenue generated by PPC. Some have even chosen to divide these efforts. However, this tends to lead to miscommunication or worse yet mixed messages being disseminated to consumers.

 

We recommend integrating PPC and SEO efforts to strengthen results and improve brand awareness and sales. How? Let’s start by looking at the basics. What’s the difference between SEO and PPC?

 

SEO, Search Engine Optimization, is the process of optimizing your site, so it can be ranked higher on search engine results pages (SERP). This is done by targeting specific keywords or phrases. Keywords or phrases should be determined based on those that may be entered most often in the search by a specific audience. A consistent and long-term SEO strategy will build your website’s value.

 

PPC, Pay Per Click, drives website traffic in the form of ads. The fees are based on how competitive the keyword you want to rank for is. Since they are paid ads, PPC ads appear above the organic SEO listings on SERP. PPC can be pricey if your marketing is misguided (or the product is new or testing has not been done) and the learning curve requires the analysis of website variables to determine ROI.

 

Working Together for the Greater Good

So, what are the advantages of running SEO and PPC together? SEO and PPC work best when integrated and strategically aligned. With both avenues having strengths and weaknesses, working together often drives response towards more favorable results. Studies have found having a paid ad visible in conjunction with an organic listing improves the brand’s influence.

 

Let’s talk a little about some of the “greater good” we found by putting SEO and PPC in the same room:

 

  • Keyword and conversion data from Pay per Click campaigns can utilized to improve organic search.
  • By targeting clicks with PPC and focusing on high-performing keywords in SEO, you can impact the total volume of site traffic.
  • Expensive keywords, high-volume keywords, and essential keywords that tend to be low for conversions can be moved from PPC to organic search. Be sure to always place your keywords in the title and headline tags, meta descriptions, content, and don’t forget the ever-important image descriptions!
  • Your PPC traffic data can be used to boost your SEO and find your best performing landing pages. Use A/B ad copy testing and landing pages to update and feed your organic listings and landing pages.
  • After an initial consumer touch via organic search, it’s essential to stay top of mind through remarketing or retargeting. You want to be present in as many online entry points as possible, so don’t discount the value of using SEO to boost PPC.
  • Testing your keyword strategy in PPC before investing in a long-term SEO strategy can help you to target users at different stages of the purchasing journey.

 

Sharing a Room Can Work!

 

In the end, we know that when it comes to increasing traffic, whether it’s SEO or PPC everyone has their favorite, but they can (and do) co-exist.  Brands still need to have data for any new product or product line, service, or consumer campaign, so using SEO and PPC data in conjunction with one other along with aligned marketing initiatives and strategies is well worth the effort.

 

 

Understanding Your PPC Campaigns

 

Before jumping into a digital marketing campaign, it’s important to understand how the program works and what you can expect in terms of results. Pay per Click (PPC) is an excellent way of gaining new customers to fill your pipeline, but you’ll need to understand the basics in order to achieve the results you’re looking for.

 

Here are some questions you may want to consider asking yourself or your digital marketing agency to get the best return on your investment from a PPC campaign.

 

Understanding Google

Google and AdWords are complex. Algorithms change regularly meaning you need to maintain an active interest in how Google is currently determining rankings and the rules around PPC ads. PPC is not a “set it and forget it” type of marketing. You need to stay on top of industry changes.

Here are a few areas you’ll want to make sure you keep an eye on and that your digital marketing agency understands.

  • Keyword research. Finding the keywords that will generate the most bang for your buck is an ongoing battle. Google offers a Keyword Planner Tool. There are many other industry tools available.
  • Quality Score. Affected by keywords, ad text, and the landing page, the quality score can affect results.
  • Google Auction. This is the process of determining which ads are displayed.
  • Click Through Rate. The ratio of number of clicks to the number of impressions. Often referred to as CTR.
  • Display Network. Google Display Network places your ad on websites as opposed to in the search results. It is different from the Search Network. Separating ad campaigns between the two networks is often advisable.

 

Understanding Retargeting

Retargeting is the effort put behind showing your ad to those who already visited your website. It’s a valuable way to remind potential customers that your product or service is available. Retargeting is a popular option that opens up another sequence of questions that should be considered. For example, you’ll need to consider if your website is equipped to handle the tracking that retargeting requires.

There are a variety of options in the retargeting universe. You’ll need to consider each type and if it’s beneficial to your brand. These include:

  • Search retargeting
  • Site retargeting
  • Social media retargeting
  • Email retargeting

As with any marketing campaign, you’ll want to be sure you are narrowing your efforts to a target audience.

Getting a handle on PPC and Retargeting can be a big job. Google offers lots of online resource for information, but having a qualified and experienced digital marketing team behind you is often best for a successful campaign.

 

 

 

PPC Basics Part 2: What You Need to Know About Google AdWords

Pay Per Click Basics Part 2Although Bing also offers search engine marketing through Bing Ads, we’ll be focusing on Google because it has a much larger audience.

 

In our last post, we discussed the basics of PPC or paid search campaigns. Now let’s look at how PPC campaigns are managed. Google AdWords is Google’s advertising platform that determines which ads make it to the top of the search results page.  

 

Advertisers bid against each other in Google AdWords to have their ads appear based on keywords they identify as important to their products and services. The higher the bid, the better the placement of the ad.

 

Below are some key components of AdWords:

 

Campaigns

Campaigns are a set of ad groups that share settings, such as budget and location. They’re often used to organize categories of products and services. AdWords accounts can have one or multiple ad campaigns running at the same time.

 

Keywords

Keywords or phrases determine who will see your ads and the cost of your ads. There are four keyword match types that determine how and when your keywords will be triggered:

  • Broad Match – This is the default matchtype and will reach the largest audience. It triggers ads whenever a user’s search includes any word in your key phrase, and in any order. For example, using the key phrase “Pet Sitting”, your ad might display with a search for “Pet Sitting”, “Pet Care” or “House Sitting”. It can also trigger ads using synonyms. For example, your ad might appear when someone searches for “Dog Boarding”, even though it doesn’t include any part of your key phrase.
  • Modified Broad Match – This setting can also reach a wide audience, but gives more control over who sees your ads by requiring individual words in a key phrase by using the “+” parameter. Adding a plus sign in front of a word in your keyword or phrase tells Google that the search query must include that term.
  • Phrase Match – This setting requires that your key phrase is used in the search query in the exact manner that you entered it, although it can have additional words before or after your key phrase. For example, if your key phrase is “Dog Food”, your ad could appear with a search for “Dog Food” or “All Natural Dog Food” or “Sale on Dog Food”, but not for searches such as “Cat Food” or “Dog Supplies”.
  • Exact Match – This is the most restrictive and specific type of keyword match. When using this setting, your ad will only appear when a customer types the exact keyword or phrase that you used. For example, if your keyword phrase is “Retractable Dog Leash”, your ad will only be eligible to appear in a search for “Retractable Dog Leash” and not for “Dog Leash”, “Retractable Leash” or “Retractable Dog Leashes”.

 

In addition to these keyword match types there are “negative” keywords. Negative keywords allow you to exclude searches that might be relevant to your keywords, but aren’t relevant to the products or services you’re offering.

 

AdWords Audience & Location Targeting

Knowing your audience is just as important as the content of your ads. Audience targeting in AdWords allows advertisers to refine who sees their ads according to interests, location and certain demographics.

 

Location targeting allows advertisers to ensure that their ads are only shown to customers in their area, rather than across the country. This is especially helpful for small, local businesses.

 

Optimize for Mobile Ads with AdWords Extensions

With nearly 60% of all Google search traffic now coming from mobile devices and tablets, it’s smart to take mobile ads into consideration. Google has made it easier for users to interact with ads on mobile devices with extensions available, such as text extensions, price extensions and call-only ads.

 

Google AdWords Remarketing

If a customer clicks on your ad but doesn’t make a purchase, you can choose to show them ads for that same product or service on other websites. This is called “remarketing”, and it encourages customers to come back and make a purchase or book an appointment.  

 

What’s the Cost of Google AdWords Bids?

The cost of bids can vary depending on location, industry, popularity of keywords, and a variety of other factors. Google recently announced a change to the budget structure in AdWords in an attempt to account for daily fluctuations in traffic. How this change impacts your campaigns depends on the type of campaigns you’re running.

 

Google Analytics

Google Analytics is a vital tool used to help measure the success of a campaign. By tracking actions taken by a customer such as clicking a link, making a purchase, submitting a form, or requesting a quote, you can monitor and tweak your campaigns for better performance.

 

Understanding the basics of Google AdWords can lead to better campaigns with quality click-throughs and higher returns.

 

PPC Basics Part 1: Understanding Paid Search to Grow Sales

Pay Per Click BasicsPaid search is a powerful digital marketing tool, and can place your business ad at the very top of search engine results at just the right moment. But learning how to effectively use paid search (or PPC) can be overwhelming. Here’s a quick but comprehensive run down on the basics of paid search and how it can work for your business.

How Paid Search Works

Paid search refers to ads placed at the top of the results screen on search engines, like Google and Bing. Businesses bid for top placement on these results pages for keyword terms and phrases that are related to their products or services. An example of this would be a cleaning company paying to have their ad shown when a customer searches for “cleaning services”.

 

The benefits of paid search are easy to see; a customer is in need of a service you provide, and your ad appears at the top of their search. PPC ads generate leads, that when followed up on and closed, can generate more business for your company.

What’s the Difference Between PPC and SEO?

When you use paid searches, you get instant results in the form of ads that can generate web traffic and leads. When you stop paying for paid searches, your ads and web traffic abruptly stop.

 

Search engine optimization (SEO) is the process of increasing the visibility of your website in search results that are seen below PPC ads at the top of the page. SEO doesn’t provide instant results as paid searches do and should be seen as a long term investment in your website’s visibility. Ongoing SEO efforts will generate results that grow over time and provide free, organic web traffic.

 

Businesses looking to maximize their online presence use an ongoing strategy of combining SEO and PPC for maximum results.

Paid Search Acronyms (And What They Mean)

There are a slew of acronyms being used in the world of paid search. Here are some terms you may come across, and what they mean:

    • SEM: SEM stands for “search engine marketing” and can refer to any boost to your website’s visibility that you pay for, but it’s most often used in reference to PPC advertising.
    • PPC: PPC stands for “pay per click” and is the most common pricing structure in search engine marketing. Also referred to as paid search, it means that advertisers pay by the number of clicks an ad receives.
    • CPC: CPC stands for “cost per click” and determines the price an advertiser pays when someone clicks on their ad.
    • Max CPC: This is the maximum cost an advertiser is willing to pay per click. The CPC may come in lower than the Max CPC, but never higher.
    • CTR: CTR stands for “click through rate” and refers to the percentage of customers that clicked on your ad and how effective your ad is; a low CTR would indicate that many users are seeing your ad, but few are clicking on it.
    • CPM: CPM stands for “cost per mille” or cost per thousand impressions. It’s a different pricing model in which the advertiser pays based on how many times the ad is shown, not how many times it’s clicked.
    • CTA: CTA stands for “call to action, and it tells customers what to do next, such as “call now for an appointment” or “book today”.

 

 

This information touches on the basics of PPC, but how do you actually get set target keywords, get ads placed, and manage your campaign? We’ll cover that in our next post.

 

 

Google Minimizes Role of Exact Match Keywords in PPC

pay per click marketing qiigoOver the past few years, Google’s ability to understand language has grown leaps and bounds, leading to big changes for organic search and SEO. Now, those changes are starting to show up in Google AdWords, reshaping the way PPC marketing campaigns are conducted.

This spring, Google has announced that exact match keywords will play a minimized role in Google AdWords. The change widens the net of keywords that can capture PPC traffic and could fundamentally change the way PPC marketing professionals approach the AdWords platform.

We outline the changes below that Google has made and how they will impact future PPC marketing efforts.

Change Ignores Function Words & Word Order

Google already treats plurals, variant spellings, and misspelled keywords as “exact matches” for AdWords campaigns. But with this most recent update, there are two new changes Google is making to Exact Match campaigns.

The first change is that Google is now ignoring most function words for Exact Matches. Function words are linking words that include conjunctions (“and” or “but”), prepositions (“then” or “about”), pronouns (“her” or “they”), quantifiers (“few” or “all”), and modals (“could” and “should”). In most cases, Google now ignores these words entirely, removing them from queries when matching them to PPC campaigns. So, a search of “vacation in Barbados” will be considered an exact match for “vacation Barbados.”

The second change is that Google will also be ignoring word order on most queries. If, for instance, a user searches for “mens shoes red,” Google will that search as a match for “red mens shoes.”

It’s important to note that there will be exceptions. If Google’s algorithm detects that a function word is essential to the meaning of a query, or if it detects that word order matters, it will still make sure to match those keywords accurately.

What This Means for PPC Marketing

This change comes with a number of implications for PPC marketing teams. Google’s new “wide net” approach to exact match keywords means that PPC marketers now need to take extra steps if they want closer control over the keywords their ads are matched to.

By using negative keywords, you can eliminate variant keywords that you don’t want to trigger your ads. When crafting new PPC campaigns, marketers will need to take the added step of analyzing their chosen keywords to see if they could be matched with unwanted keywords. Any variants you don’t want should be added to the negatives for your campaign.

It’s also important for marketers to take periodic looks at their Search Query Reports. You’ll want to check over the keywords that are triggering your ads and look for keyword variants that you want excluded from your campaign going forward.

Generate clicks and conversions on your next AdWords campaign with help from the PPC marketing experts at Qiigo. Call (888) 673-1212 today to discover your road map to PPC success.

How to Write PPC Ads That Actually Convert in 2017

PPC Ads that convertIn terms of dollar for dollar performance, PPC advertising is one of the best most powerful tools in the internet marketer’s arsenal. But if you don’t know how to write PPC ads that convert, all the time and effort you put into your PPC campaigns will be for nothing.

The goods news? The principles behind high-performing PPC ads are simple to learn and easy to apply. And while recent changes to Google AdWords have made writing PPC ads a bit more complicated, learning how to harness the potential of these changes can send your click-through and conversion rates into the stratosphere.

Looking to take your PPC advertising campaigns to the next level this year? With this guide on how to write PPC ads, you’ll be drawing new clicks and new customers in no time.

Focus on PPC Ad Headlines First

When crafting PPC ads, the most crucial element will always be your headlines. That’s especially true now that Google has expanded AdWords headlines from a single headline of 25 characters to two headlines of 30 characters each.

Those two headlines will draw more eyeballs and generate more clicks than any other part of your ad, so it’s important that you invest the time it takes to make your headlines everything they should be. That means:

  • Including your targeted keywords
  • Offering a clear value statement
  • Including a call to action

Create Conversion-Friendly URLs for Your Ads

On any AdWords ad, your URL will appear directly beneath your headlines. This often makes it the second thing users see when they look at your ad. So take the time to create a destination URL that aligns with your campaign’s overall message, echoing one or more of the key points from your headlines.

Craft Copy That Compliments Your Headlines

The description portion of at PPC ad will always play second fiddle to the headline — but that doesn’t mean you should neglect the content in this part of your ad. When writing PPC ad descriptions, think of the description as complimentary text for your headline. Use this space to detail secondary points of value that your business offers.

Leverage PPC Ad Extensions to Draw Clicks

AdWords extensions are a great way to stuff extra information into your PPC ads. More importantly, they take up valuable real estate on search result pages. With the right combination of extensions, your ads can take up two or three times the space of your competitors’ ads, helping you draw more clicks.

Some of the best extensions available include:

  • Sitelinks extensions, which offer alternative links to other pages on your site.
  • Location extensions, which allow you to include your address and hours within ads.
  • Call extensions, which make it possible for users to place a phone call directly through your ad.
  • Review extensions, which incorporate online reviews from reputable third-party sites.
  • Callout extensions, which allow you to add short, additional blurbs beneath your description.

Go Granular with Device & Audience Targeting

It’s no secret that segmenting and microtargeting are winning strategies in PPC advertising. So be sure to structure your campaigns in a way where you’re targeting your target markets as precisely as possible. Whether you’re targeting geographic locations, age ranges, audience interests, or specific devices, having a clear sense of who your strongest targets are will be invaluable in getting your ads in front of the right eyeballs.

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How to Use UTM Codes in Your Digital Marketing Campaigns

how to use utm codesAny successful digital marketing campaign is powered by data. But data-driven campaigns are only possible when you collect that data properly. One essential tool used by digital marketers for data collection and segmentation is UTM codes. UTM codes help you build unique URLs for different marketing campaigns, making it possible to properly segment campaign traffic in platforms like Google Analytics.

Below, we outline how you can quickly and simply set up and use UTM codes within Google Analytics for your digital marketing campaigns.

UTM Codes: The Basics

A UTM code (short for Urchin Tracking Module) is a piece of code that is attached to a page’s URL. This code makes it easy for analytics programs to track where users are visiting your website’s pages from. By creating a new, unique UTM code for each campaign that you wish to track, you can easily isolate data to compare one campaign against another.

UTM codes are composed of five different elements, also referred to as parameters. Three of these parameters are required for all UTM codes. Two are only used in certain cases.

The five parameters are:

  • Campaign Name – utm_campaign: This is the name of your campaign. (i.e. “summersale”)
  • Campaign Source – utm_source: This is where you are running your campaign (i.e. “facebook”)
  • Campaign Medium – utm_medium: This is the type of link used to direct traffic to your site (i.e. “bannerad”)
  • Campaign Term – utm_term (optional parameter): If you are running a PPC campaign, this is the keyword term used.
  • Campaign Content – utm_content (optional parameter): If you are running multiple campaigns with the same name, source, and medium, you can add an extra keywords with this parameter to differentiate them.

Setting Up UTM Codes

Getting a UTM code set up for your campaign is simple, thanks to Google’s URL Builders and other similar tools. With Google’s URL builders (available for web and email ads, as well as mobile-app ads), you simply enter your website’s URL and each of the parameters you are using. Google’s tool will automatically generate a unique URL with the proper UTM parameters for your campaign. You will want to create a unique UTM code for every campaign that you are tracking in Google Analytics. This way, you can isolate each campaign individually.

One important point: make sure you use the same spelling for shared parameters. For instance, if you are running multiple campaigns for your summer sale, make sure to use “summersale” for the Campaign Name of each campaign. If you are running multiple campaigns on Facebook, you will want to spell “facebook” that same way every time in the Campaign Source parameter. Note that UTM parameters are case-sensitive, so capital letters matter.

UTM Codes & Google Analytics

When you’re in Google Analytics, you can easily track and compare different campaigns based on their UTM parameters. Simply go into Traffic Sources > Sources > Campaigns to see an overview of all campaigns listed by the Campaign Name parameter. In other areas, like the Explorer, Ecommerce, and AdSense sections, you’ll be able to drill down by additional parameters, like Campaign Source and Campaign Medium.

UTM codes make it easy to track and compare how social media campaigns perform on Facebook vs. Twitter, whether you’re seeing more clicks from banner ads vs. sidebar ads, or how different ads perform within the same campaign. This way, you can go ultra-granular when fine-tuning your digital marketing efforts, helping you build smarter campaigns and optimize results.

Get more out of digital marketing by choosing the digital specialists at Qiigo. Call (888) 673-1212 today to learn how you can unlock your brand’s digital potential.