Digital Marketing Basics for Healthcare Brands

Healthcare is a constantly evolving field, one that’s often miles ahead of the curve. But when it comes to digital marketing, healthcare brands tend to lag behind those in other industries.

There’s a good reason for this. In marketing their products and services, healthcare brands are bound by strict rules and regulations, like the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).

These rules and regulations limit some of the marketing tools available to healthcare brands. As a result, popular digital marketing strategies, such as remarketing lists, are unavailable to healthcare providers.

At the same time, healthcare marketers need to be cautious when adopting new marketing strategies and channels. They simply can’t afford the risk of an accidental HIPAA violation.

Despite these concerns, digital marketing is crucial for healthcare providers. Today, most consumers pick up their smartphone the instant they have questions about healthcare products or services. To reach these consumers, healthcare brands need a robust, comprehensive, and effective digital strategy.

So let’s take a look at how today’s most successful healthcare brands approach digital marketing basics, including PPC, SEO, and social media.

PPC Marketing for Healthcare Brands

Healthcare is one of the toughest verticals in the world of pay-per-click (PPC) advertising. According to one report, healthcare advertisers pay roughly 37% more per click compared to the average advertiser. What’s more, healthcare PPC ads have a lower-than-average click-through rate compared to other industries.

Yet PPC remains an indispensable tool for healthcare marketers. While healthcare leads might cost more, they’re also more valuable than leads in other industries. And even with click-through rates on the low side, roughly 1 billion searchers click on healthcare ads through Google each year.

PPC Tips for Healthcare Providers

Here are some of the ways that healthcare marketers can optimize their PPC efforts:

  • Advertise in the right places. For healthcare providers, this means advertising on Google Ads. Roughly 90% of users turn to Google for healthcare queries.
  • Create a dedicated strategy for mobile devices. According to Google, mobile searchers are much more likely to convert on healthcare-related searches.
  • Take advantage of location targeting. Roughly two-thirds of searchers choose healthcare providers based on the provider’s proximity to their home or workplace.
  • Develop protocols to avoid penalties. Google Ads enforces strict rules on healthcare advertisers, so you’ll need to be careful to avoid getting penalized.

SEO Marketing for Healthcare Brands

Healthcare brands face a unique situation when it comes to search engine optimization. In other industries, brands can generate awareness by targeting broad, informational search terms. But in the medical fields, these search results are more-or-less monopolized by WebMD, the Mayo Clinic, and a handful of other major websites.

Because of this, healthcare brands are better off targeting down-funnel search terms. Don’t optimize content for broad search terms, or informational terms about medical conditions. Instead, focus on specific queries about treatments, services, and providers. If your brand is location based, you should invest heavily in local SEO.

SEO Tips for Healthcare Providers

The following tips and strategies can help healthcare providers make the most of SEO:

  • Create information-rich content. On healthcare searches, users expect clear and detailed answers to their queries, so Google rewards information-rich pages with higher rankings.
  • Tailor content to your local market. Local SEO requires tailoring your content to include geographic keywords and making sure that these terms occur prominently on each page.
  • Invest in local listings management. To make sure that Google displays the right information about your business, you’ll need to make sure this information is consistent across the web.
  • Manage your online reviews. Local search results are largely determined by the volume and quality of your online reviews, so take a proactive approach to review management.

Social Media for Healthcare Brands

Social media’s a bit of an obstacle course for healthcare providers. While users are eager to share content from certain types of businesses, they’re less likely to get excited about content from healthcare brands.

At the same time, healthcare brands face tricky situations in areas like HIPAA compliance and public relations. A social media misstep from a well-meaning intern can have costly consequences, so it’s important that these risks are mitigated.

Despite these challenges, social media can be a gamechanger healthcare providers. Social media’s core strength lies in its ability to showcase the human side of brands and businesses. That’s an especially valuable asset in a field like healthcare, where brands often struggle to build trust and personal relationships with patients.

Social Media Tips for Healthcare Providers

When it comes to social media, healthcare brands can find success with these strategies:

  • Use rigorous social media protocols. Develop rigorous posting protocols with input from legal, PR, and social media experts to minimize the risk of HIPAA violations.
  • Respond promptly to feedback. Take advantage of social media to ensure that users receive timely, accurate responses to any questions, comments, complaints, and feedback.
  • Share advice and raise awareness. Leaning too heavily on promotional content will turn off social media users, so use your platform to promote awareness about topics related to health and well-being.
  • Showcase the people behind your brand. Humanize your brand by using your social media feed to showcase the faces that make up your organization.

6 Facebook Metrics You Can’t Ignore

One of the perks of marketing on Facebook is the sheer amount of data. On other platforms, key metrics are impossible to track or require third-party analytics. Meanwhile, Facebook gives you all kinds of data about your page, your posts, your audience, and your ads.

All of this data is invaluable for marketers. But with all of the different charts and figures on Facebook Insights, important data can get lost in the noise.

Unsure which Facebook metrics your business can’t afford to ignore? Here are 6 that you need to be tracking.

1. Cost Per Click/Impressions

What it is: These are the two most popular pricing options on Facebook Ads. With cost per click (CPC), you’re charged every time a user clicks on one of your ads. With cost per impressions (CPM), you’re charged for every 1,000 impressions.

Why it matters: Whether you opt for CPC or CPM on a given ad campaign, you’ll want to track the figure carefully to avoid overspending on ads.

2. Post Impressions & Reach

What it is: Impressions count how many views your posts receive, while reach measures how many users see your posts. If an individual user views one of your posts twice, that counts as two views for impressions, but only one view for reach.

Why it matters: These metrics allow you to track the visibility of individual posts. By measuring the engagement count for each post against its reach count, you can measure the rate of engagement.

3. Page Engagement, Impressions & Reach

What it is: Facebook also tracks your engagement, impression, and reach metrics in aggregate for your entire page, which can be viewed in line chart form over time.  

Why it matters: Page-level engagement, impression, and reach metrics allow you to track the impact of your Facebook marketing efforts and identify macro-level trends.

4. Page Likes

What it is: On the Likes tab, you can view the number of new likes and unlikes for your page charted over time. This tab also includes net likes (calculated by subtracting unlikes from likes).

Why it matters: Tracking your likes will allow you measure the growth of your Facebook fanbase. It can also help you pinpoint negative actions that cause your net likes to drop.

5. Referral Traffic

What it is: Facebook referral traffic tracks user activity on your brand’s website that originated from Facebook. Unlike the other metrics on this list, it’s found in Google Analytics, not Facebook Insights.

Why it matters: If you rely on Facebook as a source of traffic for your website, this will allow you to track and measure how successful your page is at funneling traffic to your website.

6. Post Engagement

What it is: Every time a user takes action on one of your posts, that action counts as an engagement. Facebook tracks engagements on each post in two categories, “Post Clicks” and “Reactions, Comments & Shares.”

Why it matters: Engagement shows you which posts on your page are resonating with Facebook users. This can help you choose which posts to promote and which types of content to create in the future.

Best Practices for Managing Online Reviews

Most shoppers now trust online reviews as much or more than recommendations from close friends. Meanwhile, roughly 8 in 10 users will check online reviews before making a significant purchase. Needless to say, businesses can no longer take a laissez faire approach to their online reviews. Without a proactive review management strategy, you’ll be leaving your reputation up for grabs.

It’s never a bad time to brush up on review management best practices. Below, we’ve compiled a quick set of guidelines to help you:

  • Manage bad reviews
  • Preempt negative feedback
  • Encourage customer reviews
  • Leverage online influencers
  • Engage with positive reviews
  • Avoid dishonest practices

Manage Bad Reviews

Best practices for review management tend to focus on negative reviews — and with good reason! Negative reviews attract far more attention than positive feedback, and many businesses make things worse by responding unprofessionally.

If your business receives a negative review, adhere to the following guidelines:

  • Respond as promptly as possible. The longer you wait, the lower your chances of resolving the issue in a positive manner.
  • Be professional and empathetic. Avoid treating the review as a personal attack. Instead, acknowledge and apologize for the customer’s poor experience.
  • Offer to fix the problem. Many businesses make the mistake of trying to explain the poor experience. Rather than make excuses, offer to resolve or remedy the problem.
  • Continue the conversation offline. At the end of your response, invite the customer to contact you directly by phone or email to resolve the situation. This way, you can handle any further complaints out of public view, and you’ll be able to better address the customer’s concerns.

Preempt Negative Feedback

The best way to mitigate negative reviews is to prevent them from occurring in the first place. This can often be done by giving customers a better way to have their complaints addressed. Provide customers with clear instructions on how to contact your business if they’re unsatisfied with your product or service. Often, you can resolve the issue to the customer’s satisfaction before they review your business, reducing the risk of one-star feedback.

Encourage Customer Reviews

Many businesses fear bad reviews so much that they avoid encouraging their customers to leave reviews at all. But this actually makes you more vulnerable to negative reviews. A one-star review will hit you much harder if you have only a handful of reviews. A high review count will also boost your rankings in local search results, and it signals to customers that your business is popular.

Leverage Online Influencers

One of the best strategies for generating new business and higher volumes of reviews is to seek out online influencers. Creating positive relationships with influencers can help you get seen by more users in your target demographic. Influencers also play a key role in shaping the narrative around a given business. When influencers highlight what they love about a business, your customers will pay more attention to these features and highlight them in their own reviews.

Engage with Positive Reviews

Many businesses prefer to let positive reviews speak for themselves, responding only to negative feedback. But this can be a missed opportunity. Engaging with positive reviews can build loyalty with satisfied customers, showing them that you value both their business and their feedback. It also gives you the chance to show off your customer service bona fides. For example, if a reviewer is raving about the TV they bought from your store, let them know where to turn if they need anything or want help finding accessories in the future.

Avoid Dishonest Practices

These days, shoppers overwhelmingly trust online reviews. That trust is hard won. In the past, it was easy to spam review sites to boost your business’s reviews and tank the ratings of competitors. Since then, sites like Yelp, Google, and Facebook have put systems in place to prevent these kinds of dishonest practices. So if somebody tells you they can buy good reviews for your business, or if you’re tempted to have your employees post a wave of five-star reviews, think again. Doing so could actually tank your average rating or result in your being suspended from major platforms.

Learn more about Qiigo’s Review Management Services and Download our Free Guide.

Everything You Need to Know About Google Job Search

When you’re searching for a new job, where do you look first? While some job seekers head to sites like Monster or Glassdoor, a lot of candidates — if not most — start their search with Google.

The launch of Google Jobs in the summer of 2017 reshaped the landscape for sites like LinkedIn, Glassdoor, and Monster. These sites depend on Google for a huge chunk of traffic, so they had to adapt quickly to this change. To do so, many of these websites decided to integrate their postings directly into Google’s new search engine, ensuring they appeared in search results.

But Google’s job search also affected other businesses, like staffing firms, recruiting companies, and employers who post jobs to their own websites. Unfortunately, many of these businesses have struggled to adapt. Their job postings either rank poorly on Google, or they don’t rank at all.

If you’re one of these businesses, you’re probably losing out on a huge chunk of qualified applicants. To regain these candidates, you’ll need to rank well on Google job search. And to do that, you’ll need an SEO strategy tailored specifically for Google’s job search engine.

The good news? That’s not nearly as tough as it sounds…

How Google Job Search Works

Before we get to how your job postings can rank well on Google, let’s take a look at how this service functions.

While Google uses a distinct search engine for job postings, this service is integrated into the company’s main search engine. This means that when a user searches for jobs using Google, they get slightly different search results.

  • While the user will still see the usual organic search results, they will also see a “Jobs” panel above the organic results. This panel will include the three top-ranked job listings. The job listings include basic information, like the job title, the job location, and the site on which the job was posted.
  • If the user clicks on a job listing (or clicks on the link for “more jobs”), they are taken to a separate page of search results. On this page, they can view job details for individual listings. If a user is interested in applying for a job, they can click a button that allows them to view the job posting on its original website.

That might seem fairly simple. Where things get a little more complicated is on the back-end.

One of the key features of Google’s job search engine is the information that it includes for each job listing. To ensure this information is accurate and complete, Google relies on structured data markup. This means that your job postings won’t appear in these search results if they don’t include the right kinds of markup.

On a very basic level, this means you have two options if you want your job postings to appear on Google:

  1. You can post your jobs on a site like Monster, Glassdoor, or ZipRecruiter. These sites are integrated into Google’s search engine, so their postings automatically include the right markup.
  2. You can implement markup on job postings by yourself, either through in-house efforts or with the help of an outside agency. This means you’ll be responsible for including the right markup.

Whichever route you choose, you’ll need to do further work on your posts. Even if you include the right kinds of markup, you won’t rank well unless you’ve taken further steps to optimize your job posts. That requires a specialized form of SEO designed specifically for Google job search.

Optimizing for Google Job Search

search algorithm picture

Search engine optimization for Google job search is a niche form of SEO, similar to local SEO or eCommerce SEO. You’re targeting a specialized search engine, which requires a unique SEO approach.

Given the specialized nature of Google job search, you can’t rely on generic SEO strategies. While job search SEO uses some of the same strategies, job postings won’t rank with basic SEO methods.

We’ve compiled a few steps that we take when optimizing our multi-location brand clients SEO strategy for Google job search:

  • Essential Markup. There are eight types of structured data markup that Google’s job search engine requires. If any of these tags are missing or incorrect, Google will exclude the job posting from search results.
  • Additional Markup. There are several other types of markup that you can include in job postings. Strategic use of additional markup can boost your rankings in Google job search. However, it’s important that any additional markup is both relevant and properly implemented.
  • Keyword Targeting. As with any other form of SEO, you need to target the right search terms. First, you’ll need a sense of which terms job seekers are using to search for the types of jobs you offer. After that, you’ll need to include these terms in the right parts of your job postings.
  • User Experience. Google’s search algorithm will rank job postings based on how useful and relevant those postings are to users. Top-ranked postings will be easy to read, include detailed information, and answer job seekers’ most pressing questions about the position.
  • Campaign Tracking. Google Analytics now includes specific tools for tracking the performance of job postings. However, many third-party SEO tools aren’t built for job search. Chances are, you’ll need to set up a DIY system for tracking your job search campaigns.

Given the distinct nature of Google job search, you’ll need specialized talent if you want to optimize your job postings. If recruitment plays a critical role in your multi-location brand strategy, connect with one of our digital marketing experts  to learn more about our SEO and Google job search solutions.

Getting Your Paid Search Strategy Ready for 2019

It’s been more than eighteen years since the launch of Google AdWords. Nearly two decades later, AdWords remains the largest paid search platform on the internet. But a lot has changed in that time.

 

In the early years, AdWords was typically treated as an isolated platform. Marketers didn’t have the means to coordinate and measure their paid search campaigns with other channels. Now they do. As a result, paid search platforms like AdWords — which is now rivaled by Facebook Ads — have become part of a larger, multi-touchpoint sales funnel.

 

While multi-channel campaigns are far more effective than single-channel efforts, they are also much more complicated. After all, it’s easier to juggle one ball than five, ten, or fifteen at a time. Given this, it’s little surprise that many brands have failed to optimize paid search for multi-channel marketing.

 

If you’re one of these brands, it’s better late than never to implement these changes. So let’s take a look at how you can tweak your paid search campaigns for a multi-channel marketing landscape.

 

Build Multi-Channel Infrastructure

Multi-channel marketing depends on personalization. Rather than building a one-size-fits-all sales funnel, multi-channel marketers create dynamic funnels that respond to users’ behaviors. By adapting your approach to each users’ goals and preferences, you reduce friction points in the sales process, while helping users find products/services that best suit their needs.

 

To do this, you’ll need to structure paid campaigns in an easy-to-segment way. Stop relying on built-in segmentation tools found in platforms like Google AdWords and Analytics. Instead, make increased use of UTM tags to segment clicks on paid ads according to user demographics, behaviors, and preferences.

 

Segment Your Segments!

A lot of brands will segment their users at the top of the funnel and call it a day. But true segmentation involves breaking down those initial segments into smaller micro-audiences.

 

Let’s say you manage a network of auto repair centers. You run a paid search campaign targeting users searching for a local repair shop. Now you have a pool of users who you know are looking for auto maintenance or repairs. That doesn’t give you much to go on in terms of personalization.

 

But let’s say you create further micro-segments based on which service pages they look at on your website. Now you have individual buckets of users with interests like “brake repair,” “oil change,” and “transmission rebuild.” Instead of retargeting these users with generic “auto repair center” ads, you can serve them dynamic ads that are tailored to their preferences.

 

Personalize the Sales Journey

As you segment users into further micro-segments, you’ll be able to personalize the messaging and sale journey for different users and different touchpoints. Here are a few different strategies that you can employ to do so:

 

  • Tailor your CTAs according to where users are in the sales funnel. “Buy Now!” might be your most effective CTA overall, but for early-funnel users, you might have more success with something like “Learn More!” or “Browse Our Products!”
  • Target users in the right places, at the right times. It’s not enough to simply re-target users with paid search. It’s important that you target them at the right time of day, on the right devices, and in spaces where they’re open to re-connecting with your brand.
  • Take advantage of programmatic and dynamic technologies. Programmatic and dynamic ads automate a significant chunk of the personalization process. This is a much more time-effective and cost-effective way to personalize paid search and multi-channel campaigns.
  • Integrate paid search with other digital channels. Paid search is one of the most cost-effective digital marketing channels, and it can be used to hit multiple sales funnel touchpoints. But it’s only so effective on its own. Complement and enhance your paid search campaigns by hitting other touchpoints via other channels and strategies, like SEO and social media.

 

Finally, remember that paid search campaigns are a trial and error process. In many cases, initial results are underwhelming, causing brands to abandon their multi-channel efforts prematurely. You must give yourself time to test, measure, and refine these campaigns for them to be effective.

 

 

7 Digital Marketing Best Practices for Multi-Location Brands

Digital marketing can be a thorny issue for multi-location brands. On the corporate level, you’re engaged in broad, national campaigns that promote your brand as a whole. On the location level, you (or your franchisees) need to worry about local marketing efforts. That means taking a hybrid approach to your digital marketing strategy.

 

Yet, when you look online for digital marketing best practices, there’s little information on how to balance brand-level and location-level marketing. Most of the advice you’ll find is focused on one or the other. There’s little information on how to coordinate corporate campaigns and local marketing to complement one another.

 

At Qiigo, we specialize in digital marketing campaigns for national brands, so we know a thing or two about the best ways to market your multi-location brand online. If you’re in the process of rethinking your digital marketing strategy, here are seven important areas that you’ll want to focus on.

 

What Multi-Location Brands Need for Digital Marketing

 

  1. Create Unique, Localized SEO Content. If your brand uses boilerplate content for each location’s sub-site, these pages will likely be excluded from search results. Google expects every page on your website to have unique content. When it detects duplicate content, it removes these pages from search results. Effective local SEO for multi-location brands therefore requires the creation and implementation of unique, localized content for each location’s website.
  2. Centralize Your Pay-Per-Click Campaigns. One of the advantages of modern PPC is the ability to carefully segment your PPC campaigns. This has made it much easier, cheaper, and effective for multi-location brands to centralize their PPC efforts. Centralized campaigns benefit from the cost-efficiencies of scale, the accuracy of larger data sets, and the cohesion of a unified message. Meanwhile, it’s now easy to customize ads based on users’ locations, or to create a market through which franchisees can increase or decrease ad spending in their market.
  3. Engage in Two-Tier Reputation Management. Reputation management for multi-location brands naturally occurs on two levels: the reputation of your brand, and the reputations of individual locations. While some companies prefer to focus their corporate efforts purely on their brand-level reputation, it’s often smarter to assist individual locations with reputation management. This can be done by identifying locations with low review counts or middling ratings, then providing them with tools and resources to strengthen their review profiles.
  4. Local Listings Monitoring & Management. It can be costly and inefficient for individual franchise locations to manage their own local listings. By handling local listings management at the corporate level, multi-location brands can eliminate redundancies and lower the cost of these services. Centralized management also carries other benefits. For example, it ensures business data is consistently structured from one location to the other. And if problems with one location’s data are causing problems for another location, it is much easier to correct his issue.
  5. Help Locations Win Fans on Social Media. Social media is one area where it can pay to give franchisees control over digital marketing. Franchisees can put a human face on their business and use social media to build a strong community presence. With that said, there’s a lot that brands can do to aid franchisees on social media. For example, brands can provide franchisees with content to augment their social media feeds, creating a mix of corporate and local content. Brands can also use their corporate accounts to signal boost franchisees’ posts and profiles.
  6. Target Locally with Programmatic Ads. Programmatic ads — which show users ads based on certain types of user data — are an excellent tool for local marketing. Multi-location brands have an advantage in this field, since they can build and/or acquire large data sets for programmatic targeting. This data can then be used to run centralized campaigns that include localized targeting and customization. Alternatively, it can be provided to franchisees who wish to run independent programmatic campaigns.
  7. Mobile-Friendly Website Design. Nearly two-thirds of all web traffic now comes from mobile devices, and studies show that most local searches occur on mobile devices. In light of this, it’s crucial that multi-location brands have mobile-friendly websites on both the corporate level and local levels. In particular, it’s important that you have a mobile-friendly store finder — a feature that often has problems on mobile devices.

 

Getting Your Holiday Marketing Strategy In Place

 

Right now, most of the world is recovering from the back-to-school transition or getting ready for Halloween. But for national brands and digital marketers, now is the time to plan ahead for the holiday season.

 

1 in 5 retail sales occurs during the holiday season, and according to a 2017 survey by Deloitte, more than 50% of holiday spending now occurs online. An effective digital marketing plan could make the holidays your most profitable time of the year. But without a proper game plan in place, consumers could leave nothing but coal in your stocking.

 

As you develop your digital marketing strategy for the 2018 holidays, we’ve compiled four tips to help you plan ahead for the season.

 

Examine Every Touchpoint for Consumers

 

When planning your digital marketing strategy for the holidays, it’s important to keep in mind that people don’t just spend more at this time of the year — they also spend differently.

 

Here are three key points to keep in mind for the holiday season:

  • Consumers are hunting for great deals and discounts during the holiday season, especially in the time around Black Friday and Cyber Monday.
  • Many purchases at this time of year are gift purchases for other people, which changes the way purchasers evaluate services and products.
  • Shoppers are bombarded by ads and offers during the holidays, making it harder to capture and hold consumer attention at this time of year.

 

 

Spread Cheer (and Deals!) Through Social Media

 

Social media is a great way to build brand awareness and generate sales during the holiday season. So if you don’t already have a November and December content calendar in place, now’s the time to get started.

 

In terms of paid posts, social media is a great avenue for programmatic marketing during the holidays. (We’ll touch on programmatic ads in a moment.)

 

Meanwhile, your organic social media efforts over the holidays should include a mix of engagement-friendly seasonal posts, plus offers on seasonal deals and discounts. Healthy engagement metrics are important on platforms like Facebook, so try to post at least two engagement-focused posts for every promotional one.

 

 

Harness the Power of Programmatic Marketing


Programmatic marketing is a highly targeted method of digital marketing, and it’s one that’s ideally suited to holiday season.

 

These campaigns take user-specific data — pages they’ve visited, searches they’ve made, geographic and demographic signals — and then use this data to show users the most relevant ads possible. For example, if a user searched for “winter boots on sale” within the past hour, a programmatic ad campaign can show them an ad for your BOGO offer on snow boots.

 

Programmatic ads have impressive engagement and conversion rates all year long, but they’re especially effective during the holidays. Consumers are more inclined to make impulse purchases at this time of year, which these types of ads encourage. Programmatic ads are also a great way to recapture users whose purchasing journeys were interrupted partway through — a common issue for holiday shoppers.

 

 

Create a Holiday-Focused PPC Strategy

 

PPC advertising is most effective when consumers are in a purchasing mindset. So, it should come as no surprise that November and December are some of the best (and most competitive) months for PPC marketing.

 

One of the easiest ways to optimize your PPC campaigns for the holidays is to take existing keywords and add seasonal modifiers. Holiday shoppers will often search for deals and discounts using search terms like “holiday discounts on ________” or “Christmas sale for ________.” When tied to an appropriate seasonal promotion, these types of keywords can be dynamite for holiday retailers.

 

When planning for holiday PPC campaigns, keep in mind that competition ramps up at this time of year. Keyword bids are higher, and PPC budgets need to be adjusted to accommodate this competition.

 

Bridging the Gap between PPC and SEO

With digital marketing playing a larger role that ever, SEO and PPC must work closer together…yes we said together. In the past, old-fashioned tactics kept many digital marketers from truly integrating these two efforts.

 

Some have viewed SEO as a threat to revenue generated by PPC. Some have even chosen to divide these efforts. However, this tends to lead to miscommunication or worse yet mixed messages being disseminated to consumers.

 

We recommend integrating PPC and SEO efforts to strengthen results and improve brand awareness and sales. How? Let’s start by looking at the basics. What’s the difference between SEO and PPC?

 

SEO, Search Engine Optimization, is the process of optimizing your site, so it can be ranked higher on search engine results pages (SERP). This is done by targeting specific keywords or phrases. Keywords or phrases should be determined based on those that may be entered most often in the search by a specific audience. A consistent and long-term SEO strategy will build your website’s value.

 

PPC, Pay Per Click, drives website traffic in the form of ads. The fees are based on how competitive the keyword you want to rank for is. Since they are paid ads, PPC ads appear above the organic SEO listings on SERP. PPC can be pricey if your marketing is misguided (or the product is new or testing has not been done) and the learning curve requires the analysis of website variables to determine ROI.

 

Working Together for the Greater Good

So, what are the advantages of running SEO and PPC together? SEO and PPC work best when integrated and strategically aligned. With both avenues having strengths and weaknesses, working together often drives response towards more favorable results. Studies have found having a paid ad visible in conjunction with an organic listing improves the brand’s influence.

 

Let’s talk a little about some of the “greater good” we found by putting SEO and PPC in the same room:

 

  • Keyword and conversion data from Pay per Click campaigns can utilized to improve organic search.
  • By targeting clicks with PPC and focusing on high-performing keywords in SEO, you can impact the total volume of site traffic.
  • Expensive keywords, high-volume keywords, and essential keywords that tend to be low for conversions can be moved from PPC to organic search. Be sure to always place your keywords in the title and headline tags, meta descriptions, content, and don’t forget the ever-important image descriptions!
  • Your PPC traffic data can be used to boost your SEO and find your best performing landing pages. Use A/B ad copy testing and landing pages to update and feed your organic listings and landing pages.
  • After an initial consumer touch via organic search, it’s essential to stay top of mind through remarketing or retargeting. You want to be present in as many online entry points as possible, so don’t discount the value of using SEO to boost PPC.
  • Testing your keyword strategy in PPC before investing in a long-term SEO strategy can help you to target users at different stages of the purchasing journey.

 

Sharing a Room Can Work!

 

In the end, we know that when it comes to increasing traffic, whether it’s SEO or PPC everyone has their favorite, but they can (and do) co-exist.  Brands still need to have data for any new product or product line, service, or consumer campaign, so using SEO and PPC data in conjunction with one other along with aligned marketing initiatives and strategies is well worth the effort.